'Simon Kerr Art'

High St Boutique is excited to exclusively exhibit In the Bay Of Plenty the works of Simon Kerr.



Foreword

 

 

These critiques of Simon Kerr’s works are the thoughts and investigations of the raw and, sometimes harsh Ed Ramshackle, the accepted reversed muse of Kerr.

In this critique he deals with five separate pieces.

Each of which are done in acrylic paint and ink on vinyl canvases.

Kerr has conceded that the observations of Ramshackle are correct. 




‘Quand deux

Moureux Fous’

142cm x 104cm
Acrylic on Vinyl Canvas





Quand deux
                                                                                              

 

 

They're seems little need for more than the translation of the words that are thrown recklessly around the figure they depict.

 

The figure appears to be a merging of two people.

A man and a women who are in some uncontrolled and chaotic way wearing cupids arrow through their head, joined in body mind and soul by the colour and the uncontrolled application of such.

On the left breast there is a small painted area that is done in green chalk paint.

On the right breast there is a small rodent figure drawn.

These two things represent the age old phrase of, ‘chalk and cheese’.

It can seem at first confusing as to why there is no chalk mark on the board paint and why not just a simple piece of cheese on the other heart would show the meaning.

But there is a definite purpose for why it is as it is.

The term ‘when two lovers go mad’, which is the translation of the work, is totally understood by Kerr, (by his own personal experiences) to be a love that the two people are ‘victims’ of opposed to responsibility being owned by themselves.

‘Love is an external Joker in the pack and comes like a thief in the night’.

So, the chalkboard and rodent areas are victims of chalk and the rodent is depicted in such fashion as the rodent hunting for cheese.



 


 

‘Day of the Trifids’

 142cm x 104cm
Acrylic On Denim





Day of the Trifids
                                                                                                     



Day of the Trifids is a cult film from 1962.

 

 

The reference of ‘TrifIds’ (note the capital I) is the contemplation of LSD and its use in the 60’s to find the ‘Itself’.

 

In the top left corner we see the space figure (Neil Armstrong); spelt Kneal as in knealing to a possible lie re: the moon landing in 1969.

 

Armstrong seems to be holding a letter/medal ‘Q’ up.

Q of course being the so-called hypothetical source of all Jesus/Christian stories.

 

The gun at Armstrongs head, is symbolic of silencing!

The words studio 51 appear across Armstrongs upper torso. This being a cynical mention of the ‘Hanger 51’ area in US military.

 

But of course, here it is suggested that a ‘film’ set has been used in some way.

 

1969 sits next to the yellow flower of the hippy culture that bleed away towards the end of the 60’s.

 

The dog at the bottom is in reference to the phrase of ‘wag the dog’, the term given to governments who cause a distraction in order to hide more sinister deeds.

 

Finally, at the very bottom right corner, under Simon are the simple letters    

w.g.a.f.


 

 

'Familie ties'

142cm x 104cm
Acrylic On Canvas




                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
                                               

 

 

In this work it appears that the text says ‘banks are made to be robbed!

However, this stems from the artists life robbing banks etc

In Fact, this is more a protest work against the banking world and the families who have ruled such institutions.

It is in Fact written ‘Banks R (with a revolver) Made (note the sign of anarchy)

22222 B Robbedrs (note the ‘d’ is crossed out and the word becomes ‘Robbers’).

The crowns on the head of the figure carry the Rolex name. This shows perpetual motion. (Rolex watches operate in such a mechanism). The reoccurring crowns and 22222 stand for Family ties that perpetuate throughout banking/industry history.

The time clocks down below signify, that a ‘Revolution’ will come at once across the globe.

 

And it is almost certain that the letter R with the gun beside it stands for such a potential Revolution.


 



 

The PhilisophIKill Farmer Her’

142cm x 104cm
Acrylic On Canvas




                        


 

This work represents Kerr’s childhood in some ways.

As a child growing up in NZ; where farming of animals for the production of meat, and hunting and gathering is almost a ‘native’ trait for children (especially boys), Simon himself in fact, was never taken hunting nor did he have any real raw knowledge of the process’s of killing beasts, pigs etc; due to his being brought up without a father (or father figure). And by a mother alone.And by a mother alone.

‘Farmer’ is spelt ‘Farmerher’ in reference to his growing and understanding that the farmers and hunters supplying food to the supermarkets and butchers were in fact not the brutal ‘animal killers’ that his absence from such experiences had grown in his childhood mind, and in fact these were people who lived in ‘tune’ with mother ‘earth(her) were ‘thinkers’ equally, ‘Econ meat’ and ‘demand’, by the household consumers of our society would also have to be seen as killers if the farmers and hunters and gatherers were that.

Of course, this work has an observation of the consumers (shown by the suburbia at the top of painting and white picket fence and by the masses below who are drenched in the ‘blood’ (process), and furthermore their everyday consumption of such products is shown by ‘stake’,as in a ‘stake’ in the whole process; however detached ‘rawly’ from the ‘killing’.

This refers to having a ‘chip on their shoulders’ at having to live in harmony more so with ‘commerce’ (supermarkets/butchers/retailers etc).

 

The date 29/4/61 is Simon Kerr’s date of birth and he remains vague on its significance. 




 

‘Redemption of an outlaw’

142cm x 104cm
Acyrlic On Canvas 



                                    
   



This work is clearly an auto biographical Painting.
The date ‘1980’ symbolises the true criminal career of the artists beginning.

Although the hole in the wall gang was not really ‘officially’ started until 1982.

However, Simon Kerr moved quite definitely from ‘petty crime’ to Serious crime (Robberies ect) in 1980 under the influence of a man known as ‘The Irishman’.

A safe cracker who took Kerr under his wing.

In 2011 Simon hung his gun and balaclava up and began the return (thats right, ‘return’ – Kerr painted as a child and his mother was a noted water colourist who exhibited in Europe) to art.

Note that art is in Fact spelt Art. Symbolising the sign of anarchy which is the way in which the artist has lived his life, both as a bank robber and now as an artist.

The crown remains ‘H.I.T.W.G. Hole in the wall gang.

This tells of a Journey that is continuing, and not as a complete change of philosophy.




 

‘War Strechers on and oFF’

44.5cm x 98cm
47.cm x 69cm
Acrylic On Canvas





                                    



These two Framed pieces are one work.

The word ‘War’ has been changed to art when one looks closer.

The artist explains that this work is a portrait of his grandfather Astley Cotterel, the artist mothers Father who received The military cross for bravery in world war two.

The artist understands that his grandfather Fought so that he Kerr, is now able to live in a country that allows his own redemption.


 
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